Akbarnama: The Book of Akbar featuring Fakhria Rasikh, BMI Fellow

January 31 7:00 pm

UNLV's Beverly Rogers Literature & Law Building (RLL 101)

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Akbarnama: The Book of Akbar featuring Fakhria Rasikh, BMI Fellow

January 31 7:00 pm
UNLV's Beverly Rogers Literature & Law Building (RLL 101)
Get Tickets

About the Event

Please join us for a presentation from Fakhria Rasikh, a current City of Asylum Fellow at the Black Mountain Institute. She will be introduced by Ahmed Naji, writer, journalist, and fellow resident in the City of Asylum program.

In this presentation, Fakhria Rasikh will share both the original text of the Akbarnama and her own translation–the first ever made of the text–and why this project is so important for understanding Afghanistan today. 

Fakhria Rasikh was born in July of 1998 in Afghanistan. Historical accounts, literature, mythology, and folktales inspired her at an early age. Her first work was inspired by early American colonial history. She authored a fantastical trilogy based on that called Ivy Isla recounting the adventures of a young girl in pursuit of her soul. Fakhria has authored a comic series in Farsi called The Reign of Fire which reintroduces long forgotten Persian folktales in the form of a children’s story book. She has also translated Finland: The Country of White Lilies into Farsi, a book she found resonant of contemporary Afghan struggles. Her latest work is the translation of Akbarnama. Akbarnama is an Afghan epic poem originally written in 1868 accounting the two Anglo-Afghan wars. 

She is currently working on a novel called A Little World. The story focuses on the identity dilemma of a child growing up in Afghanistan after 2001, when governmental regulations and law are suddenly liberal, while society remains highly conservative and patriarchal. 

Parking/getting there: Parking on UNLV’s campus is free and open to all after 7pm; “reserved” parking spots are enforced 24 hours a day, but you may park in any “staff,” “student,” or paid spots. To find the Rogers Literature & Law Building, please turn onto East Harmon Ave and take it as far as you can into campus. We encourage you to park in Lot I or Lot J as they’re closest to our building. 

Questions? Please email blackmountaininstitute@unlv.edu or call (702) 895-5542. 

This program is funded in part by a grant from Nevada Humanities, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.