An Evening with Tananarive Due

April 5 7:30 pm

The Beverly Theater
515 S 6th St, Las Vegas, NV 89101

Get Tickets

An Evening with Tananarive Due

April 5 7:30 pm
The Beverly Theater
515 S 6th St, Las Vegas, NV 89101
Get Tickets

About the Event

Please join us for an evening with Tananarive Due, award-winning author, screenwriter, and scholar. This program is co-presented by the Program on Race, Gender, and Policing at the William S. Boyd School of Law, as part of their Black Legal Futurism conference. 

Tananarive Due Bio: (tah-nah-nah-REEVE doo) is an award-winning author who teaches Black Horror and Afrofuturism at UCLA. She is an executive producer on Shudder’s groundbreaking documentary Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror. She and her husband/collaborator, Steven Barnes, wrote “A Small Town” for Season 2 of Jordan Peele’s “The Twilight Zone” on Paramount Plus, and two segments of Shudder’s anthology film Horror Noire. They also co-wrote their upcoming Black Horror graphic novel The Keeper, illustrated by Marco Finnegan. Due and Barnes co-host a podcast, “Lifewriting: Write for Your Life!”

A leading voice in Black speculative fiction for more than 20 years, Due has won an American Book Award, an NAACP Image Award, and a British Fantasy Award, and her writing has been included in best-of-the-year anthologies. Her books include The Reformatory, Ghost Summer: Stories, My Soul to Keep, and The Good House. She and her late mother, civil rights activist Patricia Stephens Due, co-authored Freedom in the Family: A Mother-Daughter Memoir of the Fight for Civil Rights. She and her husband live with their son, Jason.

Parking/getting there:  The Beverly Theater is located next to The Writer’s Block at 515 S 6th St, Las Vegas, NV 89101. Street parking is available off Bonneville between 6th and 10th. For additional information about parking/getting to The Beverly Theater, please visit www.thebeverlytheater.com.

Questions? Please email blackmountaininstitute@unlv.edu or call (702) 895-5542. 

This program is funded in part by a grant from Nevada Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities.